Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

David Wallace-Wells, ‘The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming’.

Chrestomather | February 6, 2019 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

David Wallace-Wells’ 2018 article The Uninhabitable Earth became a sensation almost as soon as it appeared, quickly becoming the most-read piece ever to appear in New York magazine. Since then it has been read by millions more, giving the lie to the belief that climate change is of negligible interest to the lay reader.

But the article also attracted some criticism for its supposedly ‘alarmist’ tone. The argument went that ‘alarm’ and ‘panic’ are paralyzing emotions and can be politically counter-productive. In my view the criticism was misplaced, for the simple reason that the political effects of alarm or fear are impossible to determine with any accuracy. Academic studies of this subject have come to widely varying conclusions.

For my part I thought the article was well-researched, well-timed and very well-written, so I welcomed the news that it was to be expanded into a full-length book. Having read a proof copy I am all the more convinced that Uninhabitable Earth is a book that everyone should read.

This gripping, terrifying, furiously readable book is possibly the most wide-ranging account yet written of the ways in which climate change will transform every aspect of our lives, ranging from where we live to what we eat and the stories we tell.

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, 2019.

Amitav Ghosh


‘What’s happening to the weather?’

Chrestomather | June 13, 2018 in Uncategorized | Comments (1)

Since the publication of ‘The Great Derangement’ I’ve received many reports of freakish weather from friends and readers. One such arrived on May 31, from Turin. It was from

 

Anna Nadotti,

 

who has been my Italian translator for thirty years (see also this earlier post).

 

 

 

 

 

 

The message, which was written in Italian, was really vivid, so I decided that I would translate my translator (with her permission of course).

 

There was a hailstorm here in Torino yesterday afternoon when I was coming home, at around 4. Coming out of the Metro I found myself facing a scene out of ‘Bladerunner’. It seemed like night had fallen and the narrow streets of the city centre were literally fuming in the darkness, giving off a dense vapour that fell back upon the city minutes later in the form of hailstones, so heavy that umbrellas couldn’t stand up to them. The storm lasted just a few minutes but was extremely violent, with gusts of wind that could sweep you away.

I was just a few blocks from my house but like everyone else, had to take shelter in a shop, for the fear of giving myself a barnacled head. The sound of the hail hitting cars left quite an impression. The storm was followed by a heavy downpour that flooded the streets.

The question on everyone’s lips was: ‘What’s happening to the weather? It seems like the end of the world…’

In fact it was the infernal aspect of the city that was so striking – the sudden darkness, the vapour, the shards of hail….

 

There are a few videos of the storm on Youtube.

 

 

 


Ravi Agrawal’s ‘India Connected: How the Smartphone is Transforming the World’s Largest Democracy ‘. A Review

Chrestomather | May 5, 2018 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

 

Ravi Agrawal (who I’ve known since he was an undergraduate at Harvard) served as CNN’s bureau chief in New Delhi from 2014 to 2017. Before that he was the senior producer of Fareed Zakaria’s television show GPS. And he has recently started a new job as Managing Editor of the influential American magazine Foreign Policy.

 

Ravi is also a gifted writer and his first book is to be published later this year. It is a remarkable work of non-fiction—India Connected: How the Smartphone is Transforming the World’s Largest Democracy (forthcoming 2018, Oxford University Press).

 

 

 

 

 

 

India Connected is a fascinating – and very well-written – account of the ways in which the smartphone is transforming every aspect of Indian life, from marriage to politics, and not always for the better. During his tenure as CNN’s bureau chief in New Delhi, Ravi traveled a great deal. It comes as no surprise then that his is a working journalist’s book, with extensive reportage from far-flung corners of the country.

 

In the very first chapter, in a village in Rajasthan, Ravi discovers that an illiterate woman can use the internet by speaking to her smartphone and asking it to play a video of the Taj Mahal. This, of course, would not have been possible without the advent of mobile technology. But that flash of optimism is immediately tempered by a dispatch from a village in Gujarat where the smartphone is banned for young girls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The book features portraits of many memorable individuals, some unknown and some very famous (like the porn star Sunny Leone). Ravi is careful to avoid big pronouncements, but it is evident from his narrative that the transformations that are being effected by the smartphone contain as many – or more – dystopic possibilities than otherwise.

 

 

‘Bangalore mom and son on cellphone November 2011’ Wikimedia Commons

He cites research in the U.S. showing a correlation between smartphone use and increased rates of depression in teenagers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quoting Dr. Manoj Kumar Sharma of the National Institute of Medical Health and Neuro Sciences, Ravi writes: ‘Dr Sharma believes India is heading toward a catastrophe unless a major awareness campaign is initiated. “We have to make sure people understand how addictive technology is, and what it can do to our brains. We don’t even know the extent of the implications right now, because things are changing so quickly here. If we don’t stop to think about this, who knows what could happen?’

In many ways India’s experience with a national digital identification system (the Aadhaar card) is a harbinger of what hi-tech portends for India. The card was, no doubt, conceived of with the best of intentions. But several instances of data leaks have now been widely reported in the press. As the activist Nikhil Pahwa notes: ‘People in tech just foolishly assume that the government is going to do the right thing … But the one thing you know about the Indian government is incompetence. We’re only just realizing how much of a mess we have created here in India.’

India Connected is a must-read for everyone who is interested in contemporary India.

 

 


Thirteen Factories Museum

Chrestomather | December 7, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

 

Dear Mr Ghosh,

I noticed on your blog that a number of the readers of the Ibis Trilogy have enquired about what now remains in Guangzhou from the scenes that you have described in the books. I was also inspired to visit Guangzhou in November 2017 after completing a reading of your excellent Ibis Trilogy books.

I thought that your readers may be interested in the fact that the Chinese Government has now opened a new museum on the original site of the ‘Thirteen Factories’ It is called the ‘Quangzhou Thirteen Hongs Museum’ and is dedicated to presenting the culture and history of the development of the Thirteen Factories. The museum houses a fascinating collection of around 1600 artifacts including glazed porcelain, mahogany furniture, embroidery, silverware and numerous watercolour and glass paintings, etc.

 

 

Photo: Dr Jasbir Gill

 

 

I would highly recommend a visit by anyone interested in the history of the Opium Wars and the activities of the Thirteen Factories.

Regards,

(Dr) Jasbir Gill

 

 

 

 


letter on the behaviour of vines

Chrestomather | November 25, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

 

Dear Mr. Ghosh,

I just read your notes about vine behavior in your masterful “The Great Derangement” and thought you might be interested in the following. I study vines, but over the past decades my research has become focused on tropical forest conservation and rural development through sustainable management for timber, principally in Southeast Asia. As a side project I study sea level rise in Florida (see the attached popular account of this work).

VINE BEHAVIOR
Sequential expansion of cells around the perimeter of terminal buds of most plants causes elongating shoots to circulate. Because the sequence progresses in an anti-clockwise direction, the circumnutation spirals of most plants are also anti-clockwise. In most species, the radius of the arcs of a circumnutating shoot tips are usually less than a few centimeters, but in many vines, the paths follow by ‘”searcher” shoots and tendrils can be exaggerated by an order-of-magnitude. In under an hour in completely still air, the top 10-20 cm of a rapidly growing vine searcher shoot might follow a circular path 20-40 cm diameter in under an hour. Vine shoots and tendrils that encounter an obstacle within their circumnutation spiral continue to revolve, which is how they attach to trellises. If the obstacle is too large, the angle of ascent is too shallow for the stem or trellis tissue to support against the pull of gravity, and the attempt at climbing fails and the plant falls. (Note that contrary to the old song about the morning glory and the woodbine, it is NOT because she twines to the left and he twines to the right.)
Naturalists have long noted the phenomenon of circumnutation, and I recall that Darwin wrote about it in his book on climbing plants, but I found a series of papers on this topc by researchers from the University of Besancon in France to be particularly intriguing. I do not currently have access to my files, but as I recall, back in the early 60s, Professor Baillaud wrote a tome about the behavior of climbing plants. In that monumental work, he described how when circumnutating vine shoots and tendrils detect the presence of a potential trellis in the vicinity, they switch from following a circular path to an oval, with the long axis oriented toward to the potential support. In a very French manner, he was apparently comfortable describing the support-foraging shoot tip as having detected the “essence” of a support, and change their behavior so as to increase the chance of making contact.
You should note that I never had the pleasure of meeting in person any of the people about whom I am writing, and presume that they are no longer living. In any case, I will take the liberty of “connecting some dots” so as to make sense of the drama that unfolded over the decade after Baillaud published his seminal work.
Continuing the work on vine behavior under Baillaud’s tutelage was a young man by the name of Tronchet. In a paper published in the same journal, which was presumably based on his dissertation research, Monsieur Tronchet described the results of an elegant experiment in which he explored the “essence” detected by circumnutating shoot tips. He demonstrated with a column covered by wet cloth soaked in bark extract that the shoots detected the presence of potential supports chemically.
A scant year or two later, Madam Tronchet, presumably another student of Baillaud and the wife, or soon-to-be ex-wife of Monsieur Tronchet, refuted the latter’s findings. When she presented circumnutating shoots with clear glass columns that were dry, they also elongated their path towards the potential support.
I am not aware of any really definitive follow-up to this research, but by piecing together what is known from related more mechanistic studies, I believe I can explain this phenomenon through invocation of the gaseous hormone, ethylene. In response to even very low concentrations of ethylene, the cellulose microfibrils that strengthen cell walls in plants become arranged randomly, rather than like hoops of a barrel. Growing plants release ethylene, which accumulates where there is some obstacle to its diffusion. Cells with randomly arranged microfibrils expand equally in all directions whereas cells wrapped with parallel (horizontal) microfibrils elongate more than they increase in girth. This differential expansion causes the shoot to bend towards whatever it is that causes ethylene gas to accumulate.

Beautiful, no? I am thrilled by the way that when science reveals some underlying physical explanation for an observed phenomenon, it becomes even more fascinating. I hope you agree.

Looking forward to your next book.
Jack


‘Living with Disasters’

Chrestomather | April 9, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments (1)

 

 

 

I just finished reading Amites Mukhopadhyay’s

 

 

Living with Disasters: Communities and Development in the Indian Sundarbans (Cambridge University Press, 2016). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mukhopadhyay’s study brims with insights into the life and culture of the Sundarbans. Of special interest is the author’s account of the impact of Cyclone Aila, the devastating storm of 2009. This is exactly the kind of ethnography that is required for this era of climate change.

 

Amitav Ghosh

April 9, 2017.

 

 


Letter from Amsterdam

Chrestomather | March 9, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

Dear Mr. Ghosh, 

I recently came across your Ibis trilogy and read them all in one go. I was just mesmerised with both the story and learning about the history of the place and time it is set in. These books now belong to my favourites and I just want to thank you for the weeks of enjoyment and the valuable history lessons. 
After reading your books, I discoverd a historical painting of Canton’s foreign enclave tucked away in my hometown (Amsterdam)’s Rijksmuseum. The picture you painted in my head perfectly fit the actual painting when I saw it and staring at that painting, I could just see all the stories that took place there, just wishing I could go back in time and visit all those places myself. 
Thanks again for sharing your talent and knowledge. 
Best regards,
Jeroen


‘We are really running out of time’: a comment on my co-authored piece in the Guardian

Chrestomather | February 10, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

 

 

On January 31st, Dr. Aaron Lobo, a marine conservationist, and I published a co-authored article in the Guardian, entitled Bay of Bengal: depleted fish stocks and huge dead zone signal tipping point. The article has had many shares and comments as will be evident from the comments section at the end.

I also received an email from Dr. Naveen Namboothri, a marine biologist and founding trustee of Dakshin Foundation, an organisation that aims at informing and advocating equitable natural resource management

It is posted below with the writer’s permission.

Thanks for sharing. Amitav. It is quite scary indeed. And to imagine we managed most of this in the last 70-80 years! Anthropocene indeed!
Being a marine biologist, I have always believed (and still do albeit less convincingly than I did probably 3 years ago) that oceans are extremely resilient and can bounce back. But we are really running out of time and undermining the inherent reslience of our great oceans. To top it all, development policies are totally insensitive to such concerns and doing a great job of exacerbating such situations. There are only a handful of people who seem to know the issues, fewer who want to do something about it and even fewer who know what to do. While science can inform us of the challenges, it has little to offer in terms of solutions. Mainly because science has few answers. 
I agree that this as a social, developmental, political and ecological problem which needs not just the will at national and international levels but also the participation of the local communities at a ground level. While the first two may materialise when the proverbial “shit hits the fan” happens, the third is a mammoth challenge that requires a massive movement at the grassroots with a very crucial role for civil societies.  Given the current welcome the civil societies such as ours are receiving in India, I am not sure when and how that will happen.
Sorry for the rant, Amitav but once in a while, the frustration does get to me. 🙂
Best,
Naveen.


Victor Rangel Ribeiro’s ‘The Miscreant’

Chrestomather | January 27, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments (0)

Victor Rangel Ribeiro published his first novel in 1998, at the age of seventy-two. It took its name from a fictional village, Tivolem, and is among the finest novels ever to be written about Goa. Peopled with a richly varied cast of characters  it conjures up an idiosyncratic world of reclusive musicians, charming thieves and querulous village gossips.

In his new book, a collection of fiction entitled The  Miscreant, Selected Stories 1949-2016 (soon to be published by Serving House Books), Victor returns to his fictional Tivolem giving us fresh glimpses into the inner life of this unique corner of the world. What makes Tivolem distinctive is that the village is deeply rooted in its own soil while also being extremely consmopolitan: many of its inhabitants have lived in other countries and continents, often in far corners of the Portuguese Empire. Victor himself partakes fully of this cosmopolitanism having spent much of his life in New York. This aspect of his life is also well-represented in The Miscreant, which has several insightful and observant stories set in Mumbai and New York.

Once again Victor proves himself to be an accomplished prose stylist and storyteller.


Himalayan Cornucopia

Chrestomather | August 28, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments (2)

 

The Centenary Farmers’ Market in Thimpu, the capital of Bhutan, is a cornucopia of fresh, organic produce:

 

 

 

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chilies (an essential ingredient in Bhutanese cuisine), dried P1040003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and fresh;P1040004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sichuan pepperP1040061

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sheaves of asparagus

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celery,

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bok choy, spring onions; fiddlehead ferns,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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bamboo shoots,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

plump banana flowers,P1040056

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and ‘fireball’ chilies, red and green . P1040055

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But the mushrooms are the real surprise:

 

 

a profusion of chanterelles, P1040051

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and huge matsutakes, P1040052

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

that grow P1040019wild in the forests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The market is so clean P1040050

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P1040043that this sign seems unnecessary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fruit section is a riot of colour P1040027

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P1040024and of laughter too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A stall nearby offers another Bhutanese staple, cured meats

 

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and racks of black pudding.P1040041

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Also on display are strings of dried yak cheese, a popular snack also known as ‘Bhutanese popcorn’. Nonno Tsesham tells us that one piece will get him through a three-hour film.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh cheese and butter

 

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are two other essential commodities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the local honey, collected from buckwheat meadows, is highly prized. P1040063

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Having filled a shopping bag, we carried it to the restaurant of the Folk Heritage Museum in Thimpu,

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and were soon feasting on sauteed matsutakes

 

 

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P1040086chanterelles in chile-cheese sauce,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

stir-fried fiddlehead ferns,

 

 

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P1040094and fried cheese.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A delicious meal, magically conjured up and served by the restaurant’s friendly staff. P1040096

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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